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Asian Tribune is published by World Institute For Asian Studies|Powered by WIAS Vol. 12 No. 2526

Textile Ministry plans to introduce a new logo on handloom textile products

Sunil C. Perera - Reporting from Colombo

Colombo, 08 December, (Asiantribune.com): The Ministry of Textiles has made arrangements to introduce a common logo on local textile products to popularize local textile varieties among the local and international masses.’Textile Ministry’s Secretary, W.D. Jayasingha said the main aim is to promote local handloom materials with a traditional touch.Textile Ministry’s Secretary, W.D. Jayasingha said the main aim is to promote local handloom materials with a traditional touch.

Textile Ministry’s Secretary, W.D. Jayasingha said the main aim is to promote local handloom materials with a traditional touch.

Speaking to media, Mr.Jayasingha said this would fill a long term gap that had for hand loom textile, without a proper brand name. The ministry hopes to further develop the logo and the brand name in consultation with the experts in the industry.

The new logo consists an image of Kuweni .

At present a number at local handloom producers and power loom producers use foreign names and foreign logos to sell their products, but never display made in Sri Lanka logo, the ministry officials said.

According to the Minister of Textiles Development Jayatissa Ranweera, local handloom and power loom textile producers should display Sri Lankan identity through their products. However the minister noted a majority of consumers also plans to purchase overseas textile materials.

"We must change their motto," he said.

The Textile Development Ministry has made arrangements to train new comers as weavers and a number of handloom textile training centers also received over 1000 looms during this year.

"We introduced new designs, techniques and machines to upgrade local hand loom textile materials," he said.

At present Sri Lankan textile designers design a number of new designs to attract new consumers and overseas buyers.

"We train over 60 weaving teachers under our two month training course. They can guide other weavers to weave sarees and other new handloom products," said the minister.

Speaking to media he disclosed that the government of Sri Lanka made arrangements to import and install five Dobby handloom machines-which were technically developed by an Indian company.

These machines provide quick assistance to weave sarees in a short period. We will help the trainees to design new designs and produce new handloom products, he said.

- Asian Tribune -

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