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Asian Tribune is published by World Institute For Asian Studies|Powered by WIAS Vol. 12 No. 2792

Obama Wins Wyoming Slowing Down Clinton Momentum

David Plouffe, Obama’s campaign manager, said Saturday afternoon that the Wyoming victory was “evidence that Senator Obama is going to be able to put more states in play.”Senator Barak Obama generally has outperformed Clinton in caucuses, which reward organization and voter passion more than do primaries. The Illinois senator has now won 13 caucuses to Clinton's three.Senator Barak Obama generally has outperformed Clinton in caucuses, which reward organization and voter passion more than do primaries. The Illinois senator has now won 13 caucuses to Clinton's three.

“This is a big win for us,” Plouffe said. “You saw very furious campaigning by the Clinton campaign here.” Coupled with victories in Colorado, Nebraska and Washington state, he said, the result in Wyoming “speaks to Senator Obama’s strength in the West.” Maggie Williams, Clinton’s campaign manager, issued a statement saying the campaign was “thrilled with this near split in delegates.”

Clinton’s decision to focus on Wyoming was a tactical departure for a campaign that had played down the importance of such caucus states, essentially conceeding them to Obama, while calling the caucus process undemocratic.

The newfound attention by the candidates and the national news media drew many newly registered Democrats to caucus on Saturday — officials said there were more than 2,000 registrations recently — and lifelong Democrats who had never caucused before.

The campaign now moves to Mississippi, which holds its primary Tuesday. The percentage of black voters in the state is about 38 percent. Obama had already started campaigning.

Wyoming, with its half-million residents, is the least populated state. It will award 12 delegates based on the results of the caucuses, with 6 others who could go to the convention uncommitted. Instead of the traditional caucus format, most of Wyoming’s 23 counties held caucuses conducted by paper ballots, where participants simply placed a check mark next to the name of their chosen presidential candidate and put the slip into a ballot box.

Most of the attention focused on the most heavily Democratic towns situated in the southern half of the state, where the Union Pacific railroad was built in the late 1800s, leaving a strong union tradition that remains.

In Mississippi on Saturday, Clinton, campaigning in Pass Christian, repeated the suggestion that she was “very open” to taking Obama as a running mate if she won the nomination, ABC News reported.A Clinton-Obama ticket, he said, would be “an almost unstoppable.

- Asian Tribune -

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