Skip to Content

Asian Tribune is published by World Institute For Asian Studies|Powered by WIAS Vol. 12 No. 2400

U.S. Supreme Court Addresses Separation of State and ......

[b]U.S. Supreme Court Addresses Separation of State and Religion In Ten Commandments Ruling[/b]

Daya Gamage – U.S. Correspondent to Asian Tribune

[b]Washington, D.C. 28 June (asiantribune.com):[/b] In addressing the constitutional separation of church and state, the United States Supreme Court, on Monday June 27, focused on the politically charged issue of displaying the Ten Commandments on government property in giving two separate rulings, one that struck down the displays inside two Kentucky courthouses and the other that allowed a granite monument, displaying the Ten Commandments to remain at the Texas Capital building.

The first, the justices, in a majority decision, ruled that the Kentucky officials acted with a “predominantly religious purpose” in displaying the framed copies of the Ten Commandments, and in the second ruling, again a majority decision, the justices opined that it was a part of a display that included numerous other monuments.

The last ruling by the United States Supreme Court was in 1980 when the justices banned the posting of copies of Ten Commandments in public school classrooms.

The constitution of the United States does not give foremost position to any religion, although the country is predominantly Christian, or language, spoken by 80% of the 290 million population, and, a majority of the Americans believe that the state and religion are two separate entities and that the federal government or state governments should not promote a particular religion.

The Supreme Court, in arriving at these two decisions, examined whether a religious motive was behind the display of Ten Commandments. In the case of the display at the Kentucky courthouses, the court gave a majority decision that the motive behind the display was religious, and in the Texas Capital building (administrative building) the majority ruling was that there was no religious motives behind the display of Ten Commandments.

http://www.asiantribune.com/show_news.php?id=14898

Share this


.